Argentina, Bordeaux, Bulk wine, California, Featured, Italy, Languedoc, Portugal, Sangiovese, Sauvignon Blanc, SOMM Journal, Spain, Trends, Winemaking
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Red blends: Greater than the sum of their parts

While researching the current popularity of blended wines in preparation for a talk at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show about blends that begin life as bulk wine, I discovered white blends emerged as the exception rather than the rule. Consumer preferences for monovarietal white wines—Sauvignon Blanc is currently the fastest-growing white variety—are the likely drivers there, but that doesn’t stop winemakers from creating successful proprietary blends.

In 2014, blended wines accounted for more than 40 percent of new entries to the U.S. market, with the lion’s share going to reds (29.3 percent) and whites accounting for just 1.9 percent. When surveyed, domestic consumers said they liked blended wines because they are experimental, interesting and trendy with better value.

But it’s not the classic blends from regions like Bordeaux, the Southern Rhône, Valpolicella and Rioja they’re referring to; it’s the under-$25 blends that are marketed as nothing more than just that—blends. One striking example of success with modern blends is Dave Phinney’s Locations Wine portfolio, which goes even further by eliminating vintage and relying on branding that’s almost cryptic in its simplicity.

Through a partnership with Cordorníu Raventós, Phinney has assembled a portfolio of wines blended from across single countries. For example, his non-vintage wine labelled “E” (the international circulation mark for Spain) is a blend of Garnacha, Tempranillo, Monastrell and Cariñena that’s dry in style and sourced fro fie reions of pain ioa, Priorat, Jumilla, Toro and Ribera del Duero. Read the article here –SAOctNov2017

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