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14 Michael David Earthquake Lodi Wine Fr

14 Michael David Earthquake Lodi Wine Fresh, ferrous mineral nose, deep boysenberry, cinnamon, black tea, licorice and plum tracing a long finish. #LodiWine #ZinfandelDay http://ow.ly/i/AvKBT

Day 1 of the IBWSS

The International Bulk Wine & Spirits Show (IBWSS) kicked off in San Francisco on July 26 with a packed exhibition hall and a keynote address from Bobby Koch, President and CEO of the Wine Institute. That led to a full day of presentations, workshops and master classes from some of the top names in the bulk wine and spirits industry.

Wine Bloggers Conference to Take Place in Lodi, California from August 11-14

Thanks for the summary, Kristy DeVaney! Wee you in Lodi!

What’s next for Australian vineyard machinery?

Source: What’s next for Australian vineyard machinery?

Franzia’s Unified Keynote Speaks to Past, Present and Future

In a rare and much anticipated public address, Bronco CEO Fred Franzia delivered the January 26 keynote speech and, with it, set the stage for the 2016 Unified Wine & Grape Symposium in Sacramento. Franzia paid homage to the founding figures of the California wine industry, including his uncle Ernest Gallo, with a look back at their history and, with his characteristic candor, tackled some of the trade’s most relevant topics. As the nation’s largest vineyard owner — Bronco Wine owns in excess of 40,000 acres — he was quick to count grape growers among the most interesting and opinionated people he deals with in the industry. He credited Central Valley growers with teaching him much through the many hours he’s spent in their company over the last 50 years. Expressing regard for his peers and fellow industry icons Robert Mondavi and Jess Jackson, Franzia pointed to their similar practice of always tasting blind and their keen ability to critique what they tasted. On the subject of industry growth, Franzia was at once optimistic and …

The Taste of Scent

As anyone who has held their nose in an effort to swallow something unpleasant is aware, our ability to taste is inextricably linked to our sense of smell.

Wines of Lugana tasting

Enjoy Alicia Cuarda-Cutler’s recap of the tasting I hosted for the producers of Lugana DOC. Alicia is a sommelier and my TA at Cabrilllo College.

Deborah Parker Wong’s photostream

Deborah Parker Wong’s photostream on Flickr.

Smart Labels

Wine labels work overtime on brand protection As the prestige sector of the wine industry scrambles to exercise more control over the wine fraud that’s running rampant in Asia’s emerging markets, the remaining 99% of the industry is pondering security measures and looking for clues as to the role digital communication will play in the future of brand marketing. For wineries whose products are destined for evolving and often unregulated overseas markets, the belief that price-point alone will provide protection from the unwanted attention of counterfeiters may be short-lived. In Shenzhen, China, authorities predict that the country will continue to struggle with fraud until consumers are able to identify obvious defects in wine. While gatekeepers and educators will continue to develop their ability, and reports of illness will raise public awareness, the foreseeable future represents a steep learning curve for Chinese consumers and an uphill battle for producers.  As the market for luxury wine (above $15) in Asia grows, the reputation of wines from any protected origin will continue to be at risk. French technology …

Rockin’ the Trocken

Sommeliers the world over prize Riesling for its broad range of styles and trocken, or dry, Riesling is no exception. Alex Fox, [formerly] General Manager at San Francisco’s Bar Tartine, recently added several to his list. “If you are buildinga strong list of whites between $35 and $50, you really need these wines. The beauty of trocken Rieslings is that they are fully ripe, and they’re approachable when they are young.” While Fox and his peers introduce consumers to dry German Riesling through their wine-by-the-glass programs, only a fraction of the dry wines now available can be found on the U.S. market. Demand for Riesling in restaurants is growing; it’s second only to Pinot Gris in popularity and growing faster than Chardonnay, and many of Germany’s most compelling examples are still waiting to be discovered. Read complete article here Germany