All posts filed under: Packaging

A Sparkling Continuity: Jordan Cuvée Champagne by AR Lenoble

In more ways than one, Champagne has begun infiltrating wineries in Sonoma and Napa counties. With several unprecedented examples that include Napa cult wine producer Sinegal launching its brand in conjunction with a prestige Champagne house, Sonoma’s Buena Vista Winery–branded Champagne and the unique partnership between Jordan Winery and the grower Champagne house of AR Lenoble, there’s a trend in the making.

For Natural Cork, Form Follows Function

For wine, as with most consumer goods, packaging is an obsession, and rightly so; its role in the commercial success of a product is undeniable. Packaging is usually the consumer’s first impression of a brand and it contributes greatly to the experience of enjoying wine. We touch a wine bottle repeatedly, often read and record the label in its entirety, gaze at it while we’re drinking and we may even save it for posterity. Considering the time, effort and resources that companies devote to wine packaging, labels seem to get the lion’s share of the attention. But that’s not always the case for products such as the cork which actually come in contact with the wine. “Cork tends to be treated like a commodity,” said Vance Rose, director of sales and marketing at Amorim, “and wineries often buy cork based upon price alone.” Read full article For Natural Cork, Form Follows Function here.

Tools of the Trade

Consumer acceptance of wine packaging other than glass is growing, but fine glassware remains the undisputed tool of choice for presenting, evaluating and fully appreciating wine. While both crystal and glass stemware share space on winery tasting bars, the move by wineries to upscale glassware frequently coincides with the addition of luxury tasting experiences designed to showcase top-tier wines. “We’ re seeing wineries choosing the best,” said Sylvie Laly, director of U.S. winery sales for Riedel, Spiegelau and Nachtmann. “When a winery using our non-varietal specific Riedel glass trades up to the varietal-specific series, tasting room managers can see that their consumers’ experience is being significantly enhanced, and that translates directly to increased sales for the winery.” For Riedel customers, that choice means a baseline increase in cost by about 30%. From the entrylevel Degustazione series, nonvarietal- specific glasses designed for basic wine styles, a 19.75 ounce red wine glass runs $2.99 per stem whereas a varietal-specific 21.5 ounce cabernet/merlot glass from Riedel’s Restaurant series runs $5.95 per stem. Read the full article Tools of …

Animated labels woo wine shoppers

It’s a common sight in any grocery store, perplexed shoppers surveying a wall of wine labels looking for visual clues that will help guide their choices.  While sale signs and shelf talkers are sure to draw the attention of some, an animated label with an image that has motion and depth is very likely to stop a shopper in their tracks.  That’s just what the makers of Spin the Bottle, a new wine brand by Buellton, Calif.-based Terravant Wine Company, are betting on. Terravant has packaged three wines – Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and a Red Blend –  priced at $11.99 under their own Spin the Bottle label.  With the tongue-in-cheek name and eye-catching label guaranteed to attract attention, the wines offer varietal, fruit-forward flavors without any distracting oak and should be hitting store shelves in the San Francisco Bay Area after July 1st.    Terravant crafts these and dozens of private label wines at the company’s custom service winery in Santa Ynez Valley.  Eric Guerra who is senior vice president of sales marketing for the …

Smart Labels

Wine labels work overtime on brand protection As the prestige sector of the wine industry scrambles to exercise more control over the wine fraud that’s running rampant in Asia’s emerging markets, the remaining 99% of the industry is pondering security measures and looking for clues as to the role digital communication will play in the future of brand marketing. For wineries whose products are destined for evolving and often unregulated overseas markets, the belief that price-point alone will provide protection from the unwanted attention of counterfeiters may be short-lived. In Shenzhen, China, authorities predict that the country will continue to struggle with fraud until consumers are able to identify obvious defects in wine. While gatekeepers and educators will continue to develop their ability, and reports of illness will raise public awareness, the foreseeable future represents a steep learning curve for Chinese consumers and an uphill battle for producers.  As the market for luxury wine (above $15) in Asia grows, the reputation of wines from any protected origin will continue to be at risk. French technology …

Winning Wine Labels: Award-winning labels set standards for design and technology

With the steady proliferation of domestic wine brands, label design can be a competitive advantage that helps speed the adoption of a new brand. It can also be used to improve the earning power of an existing brand. Thanks to the innovative use of printing technologies, wine labels are no longer confined to two-dimensional squares of paper; designers are creating three-dimensional labels using the bottle itself as their canvas and incorporating graphics that can instantly connect consumers to information about a brand via mobile technology. These trends and others can be seen hard at work in the award-winning packaging designs that have been singled out for recognition by wine industry and packaging design competitions. Winning Wine Labels